Vocational Training

Vocational training prepares learners for professions with a focus on practical activities, traditionally non-academic and related to a specific trade or occupation. Whether one trains to become an artisan or a carpenter, vocations generally contain a very high cultural content. Each region has developed and refined its own distinctive vocations, reflecting geographic and historic conditions and people's needs. Vocations vary in technique and use of materials from region to region depending on the climate, topography, availability of materials, social environment, and so on.

The legacy of these crafts is as unique and diverse as the cultures themselves. Traditional crafts have been passed down to the artisans of today, who incorporate modern ideas and production methods into their work. Vocational trainings are an excellent vehicle for understanding culture. We can learn much about cultures through the tools, techniques, and products they create.

However, many ancient craft traditions have been marginalised and concerted efforts are required to revive them. Most countries still neglect formal vocational trainings in their education systems, resulting in a gross mismatch between skilled manpower required and skilled manpower available. This mismatch results in uncounted opportunities, whether as a student desiring to learn a vocation or as a trainer training other people.

Training Must gives you the opportunity to learn a wide range of vocations from cooking over making music instruments to becoming a goldsmith and directly experience an alternative way of life. We instil in learners the professional expertise in the selected field. You will spend time with the craftsmen, learn their craft, and sharpen your skills.

We help you realise your dream of learning vocations of other cultures. Please enquire with us to learn about your vocational training opportunities.

What Our Clients Say

Having spent 6 months in India, Training Must was always on my side to assist me with any advice I needed to avoid cultural shock, disappointment with my internship and a sincere understanding of the mentality and habits of the wonderful Indian people.

•    Rina Suzuki (Fukuoka, Japan)